Winch Safety—How Not to do Damage on Your Recovery Mission

Winches get us out of all sorts of binds. Whether you’re stuck in the mud, between some rocks, or just in a ditch you can always count on your trusty winch to get you free in a jiffy.

And that’s pretty amazing. That little box on the front of your machine is tough enough to pull you and your couple thousand pound machine over just about anything. But with so much power involved, it’s important to respect your winch. It’s much tougher than you are and can hurt you pretty bad if you’re not careful.

Here are SuperATV’s tips to winching safely no matter what kind of winch you have.

Winch Safety1. Inspect your Winch

It’s important to make sure your winch is in good working condition from time to time. I recommend making winch inspection part of your pre-ride ritual. When you’re walking around checking your bolts and tires, go ahead and let out the entirety of your winch rope. Check it for any damage and if you’re using a steel cable, check for rust and kinks.

You’ll also want to check the drum of the winch itself. Clean off any mud or other detritus you see and make sure your rope is secured properly.

2. Never Hook the line to Itself

Winch mudYou should always carry a tree-saver or some other heavy duty winching strap to help you anchor to trees. If you don’t have one it might be tempting to just wrap your winch line around the nearest tree and simply hook it back on the line.

This is a bad idea. If your winch line doesn’t snap outright you will certainly do some damage to it leading to failure down the road. There’s also a good chance that you’ll kill the tree as the line digs in and cuts through bark. Plus you’re all but guaranteed to get eaten by a dinosaur if you try it, so just don’t.

3. Make Sure the Hook is Facing Up

When it comes to actually hooking your winch line to another vehicle, tree saver, or other anchor, always use a hook with a latch (a latch that locks is even better) and make sure you face the opening of the hook upwards. This makes sure that the hook is forced down into the ground if it fails. A flying hook is a hazard on both steel cable and synthetic rope.

4. Use a Snatch Block for Difficult Pulls

Snatch BlockIt can be hard to tell when you’re going to max out your winch on a pull but you should always bring a snatch block with you. This little guy can give you a huge mechanical advantage. If you use it every time you winch you’ll increase the lifetime of your winch and you’ll have a much easier time with every winch pull. And it’ll get you out of those tough situations when your winch just isn’t quite strong enough.

5. Add Weight to the Winch Line

When you’ve got everything hooked up safely you need to add weight to your winch line. This is especially true with steel cable lines. All you need to do is grab a bag full of tools or water bottles or something and drape it over the cable. This will help the cable fly down into the ground if the hook comes loose or the line breaks.

6. Stand Away From the Winch Line

This one’s easy. Just make sure everybody gives the line plenty of space. If everybody stands as far away from the line as there is line being used, nobody will be in harms way.

7. Designate One Spotter

WinchHaving one spotter will save you from a lot of grief. If you have four or five folks all telling you when to turn or when to stop and go you’re going to end up hearing nothing but a bunch of noise. So have just one person tell you what to do.

8. Don’t Jerk

Good winching is slow and steady. A lot of people like to gun it to pull their buddy out as hard as they can but you should just let the winch do the work. Flooring it to try to yank someone out only gives everybody whiplash, broken anchor points, and a snapped rope. If it does happen to get your buddy out, winching slow and easy would have worked just fine as well.

If you follow all these tips you’re going to have an easy time the next time you’re stuck. Winch safety is easy and doesn’t take much time to implement, so keep everybody safe and do it!

 

Posted by K. Wright

I've been at SuperATV for over 2 years, and in my tenure here I've touched nearly every part of the business. From customer service to quality, shipping to assembly, I've been able to work with just about every person here at SuperATV. So if I don't know the inside scoop, I know exactly where to find it.

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